Episode 6

Why Relationships Matter

June 16, 2022

With so many competing priorities for employees, managers, and HR departments, why should you focus efforts on learning to improve relationships? We dive into Parks and Recreation (*spoiler warning*) to see what we can learn about how relationships improve retention and longevity (potentially even passing up larger salaries at a competitor), attracting and hiring talent, problem-solving, engaging employees, and developing employees and creating an employee pipeline.

Developing meaningful relationships is one of the best ways that you can create quality inclusivity and engagement at your workplace.

Podcast cover for Episode 6 of the Work With me Podcast - Why Relationships Matter at Work

Transcript

Introduction (0:00)

Susan

Elon Musk has been in headlines recently about demanding that his employees returned to the workplace for at least 40 hours a week. Whether you agree with his reasoning behind that or not, and I think his reasoning is that he just wants to know for sure that his people are actually putting in 40 hours a week, but there is something missing when we work from home we aren’t building the relationships in the same way that relationships have always worked in the past. Do relationships at work make a difference why should you want to invest time, energy, and effort into building relationships with the people you work with?

Richard

Welcome to the work with me podcast sponsored by IFI Training. I’m Richard

Scott

I’m Scott.

Susan

and I’m Susan.

Richard

Each week we dive into media and pop-culture references using IFI training 3D Relationships tool to better understand others. No previous experience is necessary and you’ll walk away being better able to drive it work with actionable insights into how to solve people’s problems.

Scott

Today we will be using IFI jungle motives tool. That is a free assessment, personality assessment, online. Monkey’s primary instinct is for enjoyment, for Bears, their primary instinct is balance, for Horses, their primary instinct is connection, and for Jungle Cats their primary instinct is control. 

Richard

We will also be talking about our Spots & Stripes tool. This tool allows you to organize your understanding of other people into their interests, culture, values and experiences. 

Susan

It’s really cool what we do when we look at relationships where we bring together personality, which is this the Jungle Motives tool. We bring together the Spots & Stripes which is character and we plude are Hertz model which is perspective and when you bring those three pieces to gather you get a more complete look at what people really are and what motivates us to do the things that we do.

 

What We Learn from Parks and Rec (2:03)

So we want to use Parks and Rec today to start to look at why relationships at work matter. In Parks and Rec Leslie Knope is, and can I just say I love the last name of Knope? I think they had a lot of fun coming up with that cuz that’s what she isn’t is an nope person. She is all about “yes.” All about making things happen. She’s this, she’s a Horse personality who believes that she can change the world and make it a better place and in doing so she brings her whole team, engauges them and  gets them involved and makes Pawnee, Indiana a better place to live. I love that. I love that about what the relationships that Leslie creates empowers her to do.

Scott

Parks and Rec is really up a fun show because it shows the dynamic in a workplace of different personality types, different experience levels and different perspectives and how they come to other to form a better organization. You could say that the Parks and Rec Department of Pawnee is not the healthiest organization when the show starts. The show actually runs for seven seasons and during those seven seasons the Parks and Rec Department gets much healthier as the relationships get healthier. I think that’s what any organization will do if you approve your relationships which with each other, you get better work output and that’s what the show shows.

Susan

I really like that analysis. We’re looking at, yes there are some extremes. Certainly Andy’s character is an exaggeration of a Monkey as is Tom’s. The Monkey characters in Parks and Rec do go a little bit over-the-top.

Scott

But isn’t that actually,  Monkeys are over-the-top if you’re if you’re a lot Monkey.

Richard

They do over-emphasize a lack of intelligence or maybe a sleaze factor when it comes to Tom. Andy is just a fun-loving but but not that intelligent and there are plenty of really, really intelligent Monkeys out there that are competent and good at their jobs. 

Scott

Both of those Monkey characters do become successful in some way. The character development of Monkeys as well as the other animals they become more healthy as the series goes on. Again I think that’s one of the things that makes this series so fun to watch.

Susan

One of the things that I loved as I binged watched Parks and Rec the last week or so was the quote that I heard from Leslie in season 3. Where she says you’re only as good as the people you work with. I think when she talks about you’re only as good she’s talking about work quality. She’s talking about personal satisfaction. She’s talking about a lot of things that impact who I am in my work setting.

Richard

And I do think it’s really fun. that that if you watch any of the reunions stuff or any of the cast talk about Parks and Rec they all say I’ll be back there in a heartbeat if, and only if, all the original cast were back together. So I think it’s a microcosm of that philosophy. They experienced it themselves while it takes a couple of seasons to get into the show once they find that groove, they really find it and they really thrive together. Those relationships are dynamic and they are lively and they are what make the show good.

Scott

I find it fascinating that the relationships carry over because Leslie and Ron, or at least they’re real people, Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman, have another show after this. One of the things that that you know is kind of a Hallmark of a great show is the guest appearances. I was shocked at how many big stars come on this show Parks and Rec just for one or maybe two episodes. You get the John Hamm’s and the Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard, and a bunch of other stars come on the show. Just as kind of cameos or guest appearances. 

Susan

You’ve gotta’ includes the NBA stars, Detlef Schrempf.

Richard

Reggie Wayne … and politicians.

Scott

J.K. Simmons … but they want to be a part of the show because it’s fun and I’ve got to think, for a big part of that is, the relationships that people have on the show are real. They did like each other in real life and that comes across in their work product and ultimately in there the work dynamic at Pawnee Parks and Rec.

Richard

We will be talking about the whole series so spoiler warning here if you haven’t seen any of it.

Susan

I kind of like to think about spoilers not so much as spoilers but about that they’re kind of like. These little tweaks of memory to remind you about how good the show was, right?

Leslie and Ron (6:55)

So let’s talk about Leslie and Ron and the relationship that they form. I actually want to start at the end, given that we’re going to talk about spoilers. I love that in the end we learn why Ron hired Leslie. He didn’t hire her for her qualifications. He didn’t hire her because she interviewed particularly well. 

Scott

In fact, all of her interview questions were a bomb except for the last question. The last question is why he hired her. She loves government he wanted to hire somebody who loved what they do and that’s why he hired her. 

Susan

He loved that honesty and sincerity and it came through and it built the relationship that that they had working together as boss and worker.

Richard (7:41)

The bedrock of Spots & Stripes is values. As a Libertarian, Ron values small government, limited interference. And in spite of that, Ron saw that Leslie, here, has the opposite value of, at least believing that government can affect change, which I think you could argue the most Libertarians don’t believe, and was able to convince him to hire her even though they have kind of opposing beliefs in terms of the effectiveness of government. It was her personality, her character, that made Ron want to hire her. (8:13)

Susan

And her thank you letter or thank you note that she sent after the interview saying that she hopes she gets the job, but that maybe she wouldn’t, was accompanied by brownies. And the brownies were really good and the brownies showed the sincerity in her. She was grateful for the opportunity to interview whether she got the job or not and I think that came through in the brownies. And I think it built the foundation for a relationship that enabled work to happen in a productive and quality way. 

Scott

All relationships, I think her awkward at first, when you first get to know somebody and you see them in a very limited light. But then, as you develop the relationship, as you get to know them, and it’s kind of funny because Ron he doesn’t really want to know anybody, so he just kind of puts up natural barriers. Ron is a Bear and, as a Bear, he is fine by himself, just doing his own little thing. And as a Libertarian, right, even more so. He doesn’t believe in big government so it’s like hands off. But Leslie, she just loves what she’s doing. She’s going to pull Ron in and she’s going to pull everybody in because that’s kind of what Horses do, right? Their core, that that desire to connect and that enthusiasm for what she is about, in her case it’s making a difference and it’s building parks and making people come together and she’s going to pull Ron in whether he wants to or not. And that we see that over the course of the the Parks and Rec series.

Richard

They’re able to continue to develop their relationship over a mutual interest which against kind of most surface level of Spots & Stripes table for breakfast food. I love when they kind of fix this rift it that is kind of the central story arc in season 7, you see them say let’s go get breakfast food. And Ron says, “is there any other kind?” I mean something like that. There’s that mutual love. Leslie loves…

Scott

… waffles 

Susan

… and whipped cream … 

Scott

And Ron’s character just absolutely loves bacon and eggs, right? 

Richard 

He’s just, he’s a meat guy, right? “Excuse me. You gave me the food my food is supposed to eat.” I mean he’s got that kind of philosophy. Again you see the differences that complement each other. And really if you look at the secondary personalities of Leslie and Ron you you still see different ones. So Leslie has Monkey for secondary. Meaning she just loves to have a good time and loves to help other people have a good time. You see Ron, whose secondary is Jungle Cat—very logical, very much wanting to be in control. They still complement each other and they’re able to work through challenges that the Parks Department has or that the individuals have in their own lives, they’re still able to work through those together because they’re able to develop that relationship. 

Susan

You see Ron push Leslie. You see him be there for Leslie and to help improve what she’s doing. When they are working on the Harvest Festival and the crisis hits—they lose little Sebastian and the power goes out. There are all of these problems and Ron, who has planned to spend the entire time working by sitting in his chair and eating funnel cake, or whatever he was going to eat, but he’s going to sit in this chair and do nothing but relax. During the Harvest Festival when there’s a crisis, when he’s needed, he steps in and he is doing whatever he can do to help Leslie’s project be successful. I love that! I love them working together and bringing each other and helping each other be better. 

Scott

So it really does go from him disengaged as a Bear and a Libertarian—doesn’t want to have anything to do with government. Because of the relationship with Leslie, he’ll step up and do stuff that makes him uncomfortable but he’ll do stuff that makes him more personable and obviously shows that he does care about Leslie. She has a way of worming into his heart.

Richard

You also see Ron jump in at the Telethon, season 2 episode 22, and he even says in the episode, “I wouldn’t be doing this but I owe Leslie, like, a million favors.” He wants to reciprocate that favor because he senses that.

Susan

Well and he would just as soon be sleeping on the couch through the whole night time shift that they’re taking at the telethon. Except when she needs him, he’s there so he’s making a wicker chair. as boring as it is, he’s doing something to help her not look bad. 

Richard

And I also love when Ron goes on with Joan Callamezzo (in season 5, episode 13), who’s the, kind of, the local reporter there that’s really well-known. He goes on and ends up kind of smashing it out of the park with the Harvest Festival and starts giving people advice. And the people are calling in even though Joan Callamezzo is this total mess—she’s actually passed out for most of that scene—but he’s able to help Leslie out again because of that relationship that they have. 

Susan

So you see it go back and forth between Ron helping Leslie, Leslie helping Ron and all of that works to make work product more effective and they get to enjoy being at work more. You know, it’s that, “which comes first the chicken or the egg?” It’s the is the working better because of the relationship or does the relationship get better because of the work? All of that happens to make work product better.

Scott

So what does what needs to happen for a Horse, like Leslie, to develop that relationship with an über Bear like Ron Swanson?

Richard

You have to have some kind of commonality where you’re able to create an environment where you can develop that relationship. Again the easy one to think about is the breakfast foods and the love for food that they both have. 

Susan

I love in the wedding scene in the seventh season, when Donna’s getting married, and he’s got the shrimp skewers and he puts 7 bacon-wrapped shrimp on 1 skewer because there was room on the skewer for it. Anyway that’s Ron and his food.

Scott

He definitely loves his food. He’ll only come to an event because it has his number one food wrapped around his number three food. 

Susan

But you think about the trust that is developed through all of that. You’ve got the respect. You’ve got the trust that makes work happen and we see it repeated over and over again. The whole big argument between Ron and Leslie that happens during the last season happens because that trust feels violated for each of them each. Each of them feel like the other has has stepped on that trust. When they finally take the time to work through it the trust is restored and I think that’s kind of cool. But I love that driving a tall is is work and work quality becomes more work product becomes more healthy, more effective. 

Scott

And trust is action, where I am willing to step in and do things for you, even things that may hurt me or did that go against who I am. I’ll step up to the plate and do something because I trust that our relationship matters more than, in some ways, more than my comfort zone which we see over and over again in this relationship between Leslie and Ron.

 

Leslie and Ann (15:33)

Susan

So let’s talk another relationship, this relationship between Leslie and Ann. The beginnings of that relationship were really kind of weird. Ann comes to a meeting she complains about this pit by the side of her house. She wants the pit filled in, taking care of, gotten rid of. And Leslie says, “Okay, fine. We’ll make that happen.” What’s interesting in that relationship is that as they build a friendship, Ann becomes a staple at Parks and Rec. Even though she’s a nurse, she has a whole different job and eventually she gets a job working for the city. It comes about because of that relationship and it’s a healthy add to the relationship. 

Richard

And you do wonder a lot of times when you talk about employees or look at employees, who do they know that would benefit your company? And this is clearly a case of where the city’s able to get a health official because of that relationship that Leslie has with Ann. 

Susan

There’s an episode that shows Ann’s predecessor (season 3, episode 13) in the job that she gets with the city. He really was an unhealthy character, I mean he gets diabetes and that takes him out of it, he can’t work anymore. But she comes to that job fully, fully capable with energy and passion and and all of the things that are needed to be effective in that role because of her relationship with Leslie.

Richard

And you do also see several times throughout the series, where because and is hanging out with people at the Parks Department she’s able to help them with struggles that they’re going through as well. Whether it’s because she’s a nurse she’s got that professional background people ask her no questions about those things and she’s able to kind of give him some good direction and some good guidance she uses her expertise to bless the lives of those in the Parks Department.

Ron and Andy (20:16)

Scott

Another great relationship that we ought to talk about is the relationship between Andy and Ron Swanson. And that’s, that’s kind of fun because Andy’s a Monkey. Again, Ron’s a Bear and Bears typically have a hard time, I think, with Monkeys because they don’t … they’re not the sharpest tool in the shed. Yes, that’s Chris Pratt’s character in Andy Dwyre. 

Susan

They’re emotional, they act without thinking.

Richard

Ad as far as as far as, like, planning on how others perceive them, they’re kind of the opposite ends of the spectrum, right? Where Bears are very calculating and Monkeys tend to be anything but. They, they are much more, “fly by the seat of your pants” and I think that can rub some Bears the wrong way. 

Scott

No planning .. and sometimes no drive, right? Which also drives some people crazy. But to see the relationship develop that actually becomes kind of a mentor or even a father-son relationship between Ron and Andy. And how Ron Swanson embraces Andy. Where at the beginning Ron thinks he’s just kind of a dork but he ends up mentoring him and teaching him things that he didn’t know. And it turns, it really does turn him into more of a responsible, healthy Monkey. 

Susan

Able to function. Able to hold down a job, bring home a paycheck.

Scott

Buy a house, even a haunted house.

Susan

And from that he gets to begin to do something that’s a passion of his. And he creates his karate character. 

Richard

… with Johnny Karate. In season 3 episode 2, where Andy fills in for April. April’s sick, she has the flu, she’s causing problems for Ann at the hospital. And Andy fills in. Again you see the Ron and Andy their relationship begins with this interest in food. Andy recommends that they try eating a “meat tornado” and he ends up building a trust in the end. And they’re able to throw the football around a little bit, they have some fun burning off the calories that they had with their “meat tornado” that killed a man previous year. But you see that relationship really start to develop where they find that mutual, common ground. And begin to move past acceptance. Where Scott, like you said, Ron kind of sees Any as this dork before, where now he sees him as … he sees Andy for the value that he brings. What does the city get out of that? They get a better shoe shiner. You know, really, they get a better shoe shiner and somebody who is able to contribute more to the city then he was before.

Scott

Instead of being a drain he becomes a positive, giving back something valuable to the city.

Leslie and Ben (20:16)

Susan

I want to talk about the relationship between Leslie and Ben at the very beginning before it develops into a romantic relationship. So you have the the Auditors who come to the city of Pawnee. Pawnee’s in trouble financially and so the states sends two Auditors, Chris and Ben, to fix what’s going on in Pawnee. When that happens, Leslie is incredibly frustrated ‘cuz she has this, she has his love for her department and everything that’s happening. And now they’re coming to tear it apart they go through that whole process at the beginning of season 3 and about halfway through the season, Pawnee get shut down and then they’re okay. They are able to start working again and Leslie decided she’s going to bring back the Harvest Festival. And this is a pet project that takes several episodes to happen. When they go to do the media blitz for that then, Ben goes with her. And Ben was a mayor, was elected mayor to a small town when he was 18. When he was elected as mayor he decided that he wanted to build this ice Park.

Scott: Ice Town

Susan: He wastes all of the city’s money and gets impeached. So here’s a kid who’s always wanted to get involved in politics and his heritage before he’s an adult is that he ran a city into the ground and got impeached. Not a very good resume. When he goes out on this media blitz they start with the radio. And the radio guys have done some work on who he is and they start to corner him on what in the world is a kid who ran a city end of the ground doing trying to tell Pawnee how to be a better-run government. And Ben can’t handle it. He just is a disaster and the media appearances keep going and Ben is just ruining everything he touches. Leslie takes him with her to do that appearance with Joan

Richard: Joan Callamezzo

Susan: and she tries to go after Ben. And Leslie just gives him the chance to work it through and he works at through, makes some mistakes and then finally he’s able to stand up for himself. He changes. He changes from someone who is just, he’s functional and good at his job but he can’t do anything more than the the budgetary stuff that he’s tasked with. This experience of being given wings to fly and learning how to fly, that happened in that interview. It changes his trajectory, the rest of his career and enable him to run for Congress. Think about that power and the good that he’s able to do for the city of Pawnee and eventually that build into other things. But because he had a relationship with someone who helped him learn how to be his best self.

Richard

But before he moves on to a different career he’s able to become city manager. So the city plainly, again, benefits from seeing this employee that they had be able to grow and be able to take another position. So if you want to talk about developing a leadership pipeline, relationships are critical for developing good employees to be able to fill those future needs.

Scott

One of the things that we see, not just in the in the show but in our Consulting experience with companies, is that longevity—keeping good people—is frequently tied to relationships. If a manager has a good relationship with their employee, if a manager has a good relationship with their boss, up and down the line, it makes a difference in people sticking around. Developing that today, especially during the Great Resignation, if you want to call it that, where the single biggest problem companies have today is, is attrition, right? People leaving right and left for different reasons, people stay for relationships. If I’ve got a good relationship, I stay. In fact, we were talking to one of our clients a few months ago and she admitted that she had actually turned down another job where it was a $10,000 increase in her pay. And she turned that down to stay because she had a great relationship with her boss and she didn’t want to disappoint him. 

Richard

You also see this longevity come into play when Ben and Chris get to Pawnee, they’re very used to a more of a nomadic lifestyle. They go from city to city, they do their auditing thing, they try to help cities kind of improve and then they move on. And so, you see Ben kind of guarded about who he spends time with. He even goes on to say that he calls, he says they’re like Facebook friends, right? They’re just in real life. “Because I’m not going to be here, they don’t really care about me.” And this is a great use of a Monkey, you see Tom two times, help Ben to feel accepted and to become a true part of the team. First, when they go to the Snake Hole towards the end of season 2 right as they, Ben and Chris, get there. (Susan: which is the bar) And Ben at first is hesitant to do that. But he eventually warmed up to the idea. And I think you see Ben begin to accept things. In “Pawnee Rangers” season 4, episode 4, you also see Tom and Donna invite Ben to their “Treat Yo’ Self Day.” And my wife loves the “Treat Yo’ Self Day.” She and her sisters use that GIF all the time. 

Scott

Total Monkey thing, right? “Treat Yo’ Self Day” is a Monkey thing.

Richard

It is. But they encourage, even though they have very different interests they encourage Ben to get the Batman suit. 

Susan

And they’re no judgment in what his interests are versus what there’s are. It’s just about “Treat Yo’ Self.” 

Richard

But you do see you see Ben change because of this relationship that they’re able to develop. You see him want to stay as opposed to keep moving on. So the city of Pawnee, because they have those relationships in place, because they have great Monkeys who, somewhat reluctantly, invite a Bear, who’s more reserved and more logical and wouldn’t ever normally do something like spend all this money on this Batman costume, they invite him into this this kind of special holiday that they have. This club and he is more willing to stay. He stays. And as you see them progress in their career development throughout the series, he has a special place in his heart, really, for Pawnee. And he’s able to help those co-workers that he had there.

Scott

So, you take this, kind of nomadic Bear, and give give him roots because of the relationships. What will we do for healthy relationships?

Richard

You see Ben help Leslie you also see Leslie help Ben. Because of this relationship when the Eagleton-Pawnee merger occurs, Ben is able to get Leslie to help the merger happen because of their relationship. Where Leslie’s totally ready to dunk on Eagleton for misusing their funds, they’re inept and she just loves rubbing it in their face. But because Ben has his relationship with her, she changes her tune and she’s able to come and help them. And you see that kind of throughout the series even after she gets recalled, you see that she’s willing to do that because she’s developed these relationships. It’s amazing how one relationship helps form multiple new relationships, as long as they’re healthy, good relationships.

Susan

And can we just say that the Leslie-Ben relationship is interesting because it does become romantic. And that’s not necessarily what we’re talking about here. And all of the examples that we’ve talked about have nothing to do with that part of the relationship these are all things that happened because they have a connection at work, they’re making better things happen.

April (28:27)

Another relationship that is interesting with what they provide for Parks and Rec is April. The whole first season you don’t even see April smile. She’s just, (Scott: very stoic), doesn’t like being there. As the series progresses she becomes very capable at her job and she is able to do some great things for the city of Pawnee. April’s a Jungle Cat—she’s very focused, she knows what she wants. Not a lot of emotion there. 

Richard

Her secondary’s Bear so you see her control and then just pure logic. Someone who has Bear and Jungle Cat are going to be very, very logical and you definitely see that with her. 

Susan

And she’s always working towards keeping her main goal which is to not become a boring, old, predictable person. Her way of maintaining balance is really to stay off balance but that’s her way. One of the things that happens in season 7 that I really like is that she becomes super dissatisfied with where she is. And they brought in some new interns. She’s supposed to help get them excited because that’s how she started she goes in and what she wants to do is discourage people from getting on her path. So she goes off with Ben and they examine all these other options, and in the end, Ron helps her see that she actually likes what she’s doing, that she actually makes a difference. And I love that she goes back finds interns to fill the role of the intern that she turned away. She begins to value because someone else helped her see that who she is is who she wanted to be all along.

Scott 

And went when they ask, “how did you get all these interns?”, she said, “I thought to myself, what would Leslie do?” What would the Horse do? So that’s a wonderful example of how you can put on a skin, right, of another animal. And instead of being a Jungle Cat-Bear to say, “okay, how can I slip on this Horse skin and attract people?”, which is that connection that’s that’s a strength that all Horses have. 

Susan

And the relationships that she’s cultivated the relationships that exist over that 10 year. Finally now she’s happy in her job. I think that’s exciting and she’s going to stay

Richard

And who wouldn’t want to see your intern go from intern to full-time employee to eventually department head? That’s a great leadership pipeline right there. And, again established because of those relationships, and even relationships that she resist at first. She has to develop and appreciate those relationships more overtime.

Scott

Relationships matter! So relationships, work-related relationships become friends, right? Something that carries over to outside of work and that’s when you know you got something as as a business, when people want to be with each other. They want to associate. When they leave work and they go to to a bar or to the restaurant or when they like being with each other then you know that you’ve got something special. And those relationships will naturally create better work product and eliminate turnover people will stay employed longer and even take less money because they care about each other. That’s the importance of business relationships relationships.

Fears of Developing Relationships (31:55)

Richard

I think there’s this fear that a lot of people have it if they develop relationships at work it’s going to be messy, it’s going to take more time and effort and the benefits don’t outweigh the costs of developing relationships. And maybe there are certain times when that could be true, but I do feel like if you look at season 4, episode 8 “The Smallest Park”, you see Leslie and Ben and try to break off the relationship, ‘cuz you’re not supposed to be dating, they break off this relationship but there are still able to work through that. And I think that those things happen when people get romantically involved sometimes. But the business relationships, when they’re focused on just being good, healthy relationships are going to outweigh the costs of developing those—in terms of what you get back in in employee retention and longevity, in terms of being able to hire employees, in terms of all the benefits that you have. That the trade-off cost of developing those relationships, especially for someone like me who’s who’s a Bear, or even maybe a Jungle Cat who feels like those aren’t as appropriate, the benefit of those relationships far outweighs the cost. 

The Benefits of Relationships at Work (33:18)

Susan

We’ve hit a bunch of important things that relationships do in the workplace and why they matter but I just want to review them all in one place. They will help with retention and longevity, which if you’re all about the bottom line that’s a big deal with the bottom line. Employees will even stay for less money when their relationship is there. They help with hiring and attracting good employees absolutely they help with work engagement because you like being at work. You like the people you’re working with, you’ll engage in the work better. That impacts quality. It also impacts problem-solving. When things are going wrong employees will engage to figure out why because of relationships. There’s a cost reduction to health. Multiple studies show that employee help is improved when they like being at work when they have people that care about at work with them and then you are also developing your employees. So a whole bunch of reasons why you want good relationships, good culture in your workplace.

Scott

I think it’s also important to note that lot of businesses we see, a lot of businesses try and spend a lot of money on inclusivity and engagement campaigns. And I think businesses need to understand that engagement happens one employee at a time. Tt’s about one person having a relationship with someone else. And, I will be honest, I think people today have a harder time with relationships than ever before. Because of the internet or technology, social circles, social media, we tend to, I think, struggle. Some people tend to struggle with developing meaningful relationships. The gimmicks, or some of the programs, trying to force inclusivity or force engagement on employees, that’s going to backfire or won’t work like you think it will. What we need to do is teach people how to have healthy relationships at work. And those healthy relationships at work will also spill over into healthy relationships in your personal life. It’s a skill if I could learn how to have healthy relationships that does solve a lot of problems. And it is a skill that everyone can learn.

Richard

Thank you so much for listening to this episode of Work With Me. You can get show notes or contribute to a discussion on the Work With Me podcast page at IFItraining.com/workwithme. If you found value in today’s episode, please do us a huge favor share this episode with somebody, maybe somebody that you work with or would like to work with. And tell them about how your relationship matters. We are available on all major podcast apps go ahead and has five stars, ‘cuz obviously it’s that good. 😉

Scott

Now go make relationships work for you!

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